LGBT History Month – bi role models

Drew Barrymore

Drew Barrymore (born February 22, 1975) is an actress, producer, writer, and director. As a child actress, she became well-known for her performance in E.T.. Since then she starred in many films and, along with Nancy Juvonen, has started her own production company, Flower Films. In 2003 in and interview with Contact Music she acknowledged that she is and always has been bi.

Debra Kolodny

Debra Kolodny is a bi rights activist and Jewish renewal rabbi. She edited the first anthology by bi people of faith, Blessed Bi Spirit (2000), to which she contributed “Hear, I Pray You, This Dream Which I Have Dreamed,” about Jewish identity and bisexuality.

Dr Fritz Klein

(December 27, 1932 – May 24, 2006) Fritz Klein was a bi American sex researcher, psychiatrist, author, and creator of the Klein Sexual Orientation Grid. He was a pioneering bi rights activist, who was an important figure in the modern LGBT rights movement. Dr. Klein also founded the American Institute of Bisexuality.

Malcolm X

Malcolm X (May 19, 1925 – Feb 21, 1965) was an African-American Muslim minister and human rights activist. To his admirers he was a courageous advocate for the rights of blacks, a man who indicted white America in the harshest terms for its crimes against black Americans; detractors accused him of preaching racism and violence. He has been called one of the greatest and most influential African Americans in history.

Malcolm X was presumed to be straight until Bruce Perry’s biography “Malcolm – The Life of a Man Who Changed Black America” was published. In numerous interviews with associates, friends, and family it was revealed that Malcolm X had had multiple same sex partners before his marriage to Betty Shabazz.

Brenda Fassie

Fassie (3 November 1964 – 9 May 2004) was a South African pop singer. She was considered a voice for disenfranchised blacks in apartheid South Africa. She was affectionately known as the Queen of African Pop or Africa’s Madonna. Brenda Fassie was bi which, while taboo for many Black South Africans, served to enhance her rebellious image among her fans in the country’s defiant townships.

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